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Postdoctoral Openings

Deciphering the essential role of autophagy in preventing atherosclerosis using a novel zebrafish model (available immediately)

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department/Research Unit:

Molecular Biology

Description:

Heart attack and stroke are the leading causes of death in the United States. Both are the manifestations of atherosclerosis, a slow, life-long buildup of lipids (cholesterol and fat) in the plaques of blood vessel wall. Eventually, the lipid-overloaded plaques rupture and clog the blood vessels in the heart or the brain, causing heart attack or stroke. Macrophages are the major type of lipid-loaded cells in the plaques. Proper removal of lipid droplets (LDs) inside the macrophages is critical for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. However, the knowledge of LD dynamics in macrophages is very limited.

A postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Nazarko group will develop zebrafish as a novel model to study LD degradation by autophagy, an important cellular recycling pathway (2016 Nobel Prize). Then, they will use this model to study the role of macrophage LD autophagy in preventing atherosclerosis. To reach this goal, they will develop a new fluorescence-based assay to measure LD autophagy in macrophages in live zebrafish. They will use this assay in combination with autophagy modulators to test the role of autophagy in the development of atherosclerosis using zebrafish genetic models of the disease.

Initial appointment is for 1 year with possible extension for up to 5 years of overall postdoctoral training. Salary is commensurate with experience (NIH NRSA scale).

Successful applicants should:

  1. Have a recent PhD and extensive experience of working with zebrafish.

How to apply:

Please send CV and contact information of three references to Dr. Taras Nazarko tnazarko@ucsd.edu.

Epigenetic Gene Regulation

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department/Research Unit:

Molecular Biology

Description:

We invite applications from highly motivated candidates for a postdoctoral position focused on elucidating molecular mechanisms of epigenetic gene regulation in cancer using a combination of biochemical, molecular, cellular, and genomic approaches. The candidate should have a strong interest in epigenetics, chromatin biology, and gene regulation. The candidate should also have experience in using biochemical and molecular biology techniques. Previous experience with system-wide data analysis is desirable but not necessary.

Projects in the lab are focused on the investigation of epigenetic mechanisms of transcriptional control, with a focus on chromatin-modifying factors, covalent posttranslational modifications of histone proteins, and noncoding RNAs in modulating gene expression networks regulated by wild-type p53 and the tumor-promoting p53 mutants in various mammalian biological contexts that include inflammatory responses, DNA damage, metabolism, and development.

Successful applicants should:

  1. Have a PhD and/or MD degree with research experience in biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology as evident by peer-reviewed publications in reputable journals.
  2. Be highly motivated, detail oriented, responsible individual with excellent communication and organizational skills
  3. Preference will be given to candidates with experience programming in R, Python, next generation sequencing analysis, or other bioinformatics techniques

How to apply:

Please email your cover letter, curriculum vitae, and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Shannon Lauberth slauberth@ucsd.edu.

For more information, please visit the Lauberth Lab website.

Biochemical mechanisms and crosstalk of immune checkpoint receptors

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department/Research Unit:

Cell and Developmental Biology

Description:

Postdoctoral positions are available at Dr. Enfu Hui’s newly launched laboratory at the Division of Biological Sciences of University of California San Diego (UCSD). Dr. Hui has pioneered a novel membrane reconstitution system to understand the precise mechanisms of T cell activation (Hui & Vale, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol., 2014) and suppression. He discovered that the T cell costimulatory receptor CD28 is a primary target of PD-1, an immune checkpoint receptor that can be hijacked by cancer for immune evasion.

The Hui Lab is interested in the biochemical mechanisms and crosstalk of additional immune checkpoint receptors, which are viable cancer immunotherapy targets with poorly defined molecular mechanisms. The successful candidates will investigate these fundamental questions using a combination of state-of-the-art membrane reconstitution, live cell single molecule imaging, cell biological, and synthetic biological techniques.

Successful applicants should:

  1. Have or expect a Ph.D. degree at the time of application.
  2. Prior experience with microscopy, protein chemistry, and signal transduction is preferred.

How to apply:

To apply, please send CV and contact information of three references to Dr. Enfu Hui enfuhui@ucsd.edu.

All positions are contingent on funding becoming available.

Applicants are welcome to include in their cover letters a personal statement summarizing leadership efforts and/or contributions to diversity. UC San Diego is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff.