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Postdoctoral Openings

Postdoctoral position joint UCSD-NYU

Group of researchers at UCSD/NYU

We are seeking a postdoc interested in a joint position in the Bhabha/Ekiert labs (NYU School of Medicine) and the Troemel Lab (UC San Diego). This project will be based in New York City, in the Bhabha and Ekiert labs, and will focus on a structural, biochemical and mechanistic understanding of the intracellular Pathogen Response (IPR), a stress/immune response discovered in the Troemel lab.

The Bhabha/Ekiert labs use structure-driven approaches to study bacteria, parasites, and host-pathogen interactions. You will be joining a diverse group of students, postdocs, and will work towards unraveling the structural basis of proteins important for the host response to infection. The Troemel lab focuses on studying the IPR in vivo in C. elegans. You will work in close collaboration with Emily and other Troemel lab members to gain a holistic understanding of the IPR pathway, and will join an interdisciplinary and collaborative team focused on understandiing a novel immune pathway in epithelial cells.

More information

Bhabha / Ekiert Lab: https://bhabhaekiertlab.org

Troemel Lab: https://troemellab.biosci.ucsd.edu

Location

Manhattan, New York City

Qualifications

  • PhD in biochemistry, structural biology or related field
  • Some experience in strctural biology
  • Excellent communication skills (written and oral)
  • Willingness to travel to San Diego a few times a year to interact with collaborators in person
  • Ability and desire to mentor junior scientists
  • Very organized
  • Detail-oriented
  • Excellent digital record-keping skills
  • Enjoys working with others

To apply

Email belabrecruitment@gmail.com with

  • A cover letter that highlights your experience, contributions to science, and interests
  • CV
  • Names and contact information of 3 references

UCSD-Genentech Joint Postdoc

Summary

Dr. Enfu Hui’s lab at UC San Diego and Dr. Wenxian Fu’s lab at Genentech is recruiting a joint postdoctoral fellow to work on the molecular mechanisms of the immune checkpoint pathways with exciting clinical relevance. The selected candidate will be supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from Genentech and receive a multidisciplinary training in biochemistry, cell biology, cellular imaging and cancer immunology from two well-established PIs with complementary expertise.

The UC San Diego is located on the La Jolla Mesa in close proximity to The Scripps Research Institute, the Salk Institute, and the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute Research and provides a highly stimulating, collaborative, and interactive research environment in a beautiful location.

Considered as the founder of biotech industry and now a member of the Roche Group, Genentech is dedicated to pursuing groundbreaking science to discover and develop medicines for people with serious and life-threatening diseases. Our transformational discoveries include the first targeted antibody for cancer and the first medicine for primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

Related recent publications from the Hui lab

  • Molecular features underlying differential SHP1/SHP2 binding of immune checkpoint receptors. Xu X*, Masubuchi T*, Cai Q, Zhao Y, Hui E. Elife. 2021;10. Epub 2021/11/05. doi: 10.7554/eLife.74276. PMID: 34734802.
  • PD-1 and BTLA regulate T cell signaling differentially and only partially through SHP1 and SHP2. Xu X*., Hou B*., Fulzele A., Masubuchi T., Zhao Y., Wu Z., Hu Y., Jiang Y., Ma Y., Wang H., Bennett E., Fu G., Hui E. Journal of Cell Biology, 2020
  • PD-L1:CD80 Cis-Heterodimer Triggers the Co-stimulatory Receptor CD28 While Repressing the Inhibitory PD-1 and CTLA-4 Pathways. Zhao Y, Lee CK, Lin CH, Gassen RB, Xu X, Huang Z, Xiao C, Bonorino C, Lu LF, Bui JD, Hui E. Immunity. 2019 Nov 15. PMID: 31757674.
  • Antigen-Presenting Cell-Intrinsic PD-1 Neutralizes PD-L1 in cis to Attenuate PD-1 Signaling in T Cells. Zhao, Y., Harrison, D. L., Song, Y., Ji, J., Huang, J., and Hui, E. Cell Rep 2018;24:379-90 e376.

Related recent publications from the Fu lab

  • TCF1 and LEF1 Control Treg Competitive Survival and Tfr Development to Prevent Autoimmune Diseases. Yang BH, Wang K, Wan S, Liang Y, Yuan X, Dong Y, Cho S, Xu W, Jepsen K, Feng GS, Lu LF, Xue HH, Fu W. Cell Rep. 2019 Jun 18 PMID: 31216480
  • Expansion of Islet-Resident Macrophages Leads to Inflammation Affecting β Cell Proliferation and Function in Obesity. Ying W, Lee YS, Dong Y, Seidman JS, Yang M, Isaac R, Seo JB, Yang BH, Wollam J, Riopel M, McNelis J, Glass CK, Olefsky JM, Fu W. Cell Metab. 2019 Feb 5 PMID: 30595478
  • CD122 blockade restores immunological tolerance in autoimmune type 1 diabetes via multiple mechanisms. Yuan X, Dong Y, Tsurushita N, Tso JY, Fu W. JCI Insight. 2018 Jan 25 PMID: 29367461
  • CRIg, a tissue-resident macrophage specific immune checkpoint molecule, promotes immunological tolerance in NOD mice, via a dual role in effector and regulatory T cells. Yuan X, Yang BH, Dong Y, Yamamura A, Fu W. Elife. 2017 Nov 24 PMID: 29171836

Additional information can be found at:

Qualifications

We welcome highly motivated and collaborative candidates who have

  1. a PhD in cellular immunology, biochemistry, molecular biology or cell biology.
  2. a track record of successfully completed research project(s), first-author publication(s) in impactful journals.
  3. creative problem-solving skills and excellent oral/written communication skills.

Candidates with mechanistic thinking and microscopy experience are preferred. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, or disability.

How to Apply

To apply, please email both enfuhui@ucsd.edu and fu.wenxian@gene.com.

Email applications should include:

  • Cover letter summarizing previous research experience and future goals
  • CV with complete publication list
  • Contact information for 3 referees

Postdoctoral Position-Mechanisms of plant development

Description:

The Muroyama lab at the University of California San Diego is recruiting highly motivated postdoctoral candidates to join our group. Research in the Muroyama lab is centered around the cellular mechanisms that underlie plant development, with a current focus on the pathways that regulate cell division and tissue polarity. The lab is also interested in developing new methods to surveil, perturb and quantify developmental processes in living plants. Additionally, there are opportunities to lead projects related to understanding how evolution has sculpted highly conserved developmental pathways for species and/or tissue-specific functions.

Applicant Qualifications:

  • Applicants should have a Ph.D. in biology or a related field. Candidates with a Ph.D. in another scientific field will be considered with a proposed project that fits into the research scope of the lab.
  • Demonstrated expertise and strong interest in current molecular and cellular biology techniques, including microscopy, image analysis, proteomics, and biochemistry is beneficial.
  • Previous experience working with plants is a benefit but not required.
  • Strong oral communications skills are required.

Research Environment:

The Muroyama Lab is part of the dynamic Cell and Developmental Biology Section within the Division of Biological Sciences at UC San Diego. Postdoctoral researchers will receive regular, supportive mentorship focused on developing independent projects and geared toward individual career goals. Our group is part of a large, plant-focused research community that includes labs at UC San Diego and the neighboring Salk Institute and Scripps Research Institute. Postdocs are encouraged to participate in the community-building activities on campus, including seminars and collaborative projects.

How to apply:

Interested applicants should send the following material to amuroyama@ucsd.edu:

  • CV
  • Description of research interests and how you see them fitting into the ongoing mission of the lab.
  • Contact information for 3 references.

Postdoctoral Position at UC San Diego: Advancing Equitable Hiring of Teaching-Focused Faculty in STEM

A postdoctoral position is available with Professor Stanley Lo in the School of Biological Sciences at University of California San Diego as part of the Hiring Interventions for Representation and Equity (HIRE) Alliance project funded by the National Science Foundation (HRD-2113355). We are using design-based research to develop, implement, self-study, and evaluate a model to advance equitable hiring of teaching-focused faculty in STEM. Specifically, the position will collaborate with social science researchers, professional evaluators, and faculty fellows in the Alliance to examine how departmental and institutional factors may support or prevent the implementation of equitable faculty hiring practices.

What we offer:

The HIRE Alliance is a stimulating intellectual environment with freedom to develop new research directions and collaborations with researchers across multiple UC campuses. At UC San Diego, we have a vibrant discipline-based education research community in STEM, a Science of Teaching seminar series in Biological Sciences, and a Ph.D. program in Mathematics and Science Education (jointly offered with San Diego State University). The postdoctoral scholar will participate in all phases of research in a complex project, including instrument development, data collection and analysis, publications, and new grant writing, while being encouraged to build on their own emerging research agenda. We support postdoctoral scholars with mentorship for multi-faceted career development and opportunities tailored towards individual career goals.

What we are looking for

Candidates should have relevant methodological backgrounds; an understanding of the current literature on equity, diversity, and inclusion in postsecondary education; and strong verbal and written communication skills. We particularly value collaborative and motivated individuals with the ability to work independently, mentor students, and manage multiple parallel projects. Candidates with Ph.D. or equivalent degree in any STEM discipline, education, learning sciences, or related fields are encouraged to apply.

How to apply:

Interested applicants should send a cover letter (summarizing their relevant experiences to the position and describing their research interests and career plans), curriculum vitae, and the names and contact information of three references to Stanley Lo (smlo@ucsd.edu).

Aquatic Microbial Ecology

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Ecology, Behavior and Evolution

Description:

Postdoctoral researcher in aquatic microbial ecology to work in the Jackrel Lab in Ecology, Behavior and Evolution at University of California San Diego. Position will include field research in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington (ideally May through August), including Olympic National Park, Olympic National Forest, and private logging lands. Position also includes computational genomics and wet lab microbiological research at UCSD during the off-season. Strong preference will be given for applicants with prior ecology research experience in remote field environments. Applicants with prior computational experience and interest in analyzing amplicon and shotgun metagenomics datasets preferred.

We are recruiting a postdoctoral researcher to study the Home-Field Advantage in riparian ecosystems. Aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities are capable of rapidly degrading local species and even local genotypes of plants more rapidly than non-local plants. Research will investigate the underlying drivers and consequences of this Home-Field Advantage of leaf decomposition. How does land use, including intensity of logging operations, effect the HFA? What are the effects of the HFA on the aquatic carbon cycle, carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions, and aquatic food webs? The postdoc will have the opportunity to analyze a large metagenomics dataset from the Joint Genome Institute Community Science Program to study bacterial drivers of the Home-Field Advantage and the role of locally accelerated litter decomposition in the carbon cycle. Individual will be given substantial intellectual freedom and opportunity to launch side projects. Applications will be reviewed starting immediately with a preferred start date in Winter/Spring 2022, prior to the Summer field season.

Qualifications

  • Knowledge of and enthusiasm for occasional back country camping preferred.
  • Housing for most of the field season can be arranged at a field station.
  • Applicant must have a valid driver’s license.

How to Apply:

Please email sjackrel@ucsd.edu to apply. Email applications should include:

  • Cover letter summarizing previous research experience
  • CV
  • Contact information for 3 professional references

Postdoctoral Position in the Hao Lab

Description of research:

We are looking for enthusiastic candidates for a postdoctoral position in the Hao lab at UCSD. Our laboratory combines biology, engineering, and computer science to study the dynamics and function of regulatory responses upon stress, aging, and disease. Current directions focus on using systems and synthetic biology approaches to investigate how metabolic and gene regulatory networks govern single-cell aging trajectories and how microbiota influences organismal aging dynamics and healthspan. Our research projects span the spectrum of model organisms for studying the biology of aging. Researchers with experience in genetics and physiology of budding yeast or fruit fly are especially encouraged to apply. For more information, please visit http://haolab.ucsd.edu.

Related recent publications:

  • A programmable fate decision landscape underlies single-cell aging in yeast.
    Yang Li, Yanfei Jiang, Julie Paxman, Richard O'Laughlin, Stephen Klepin, Yuelian Zhu, Lorraine Pillus, Lev S. Tsimring, Jeff Hasty, Nan Hao
    Science. 2020 Jul 17; 369(6501):325-329.
  • Divergent aging of isogenic yeast cells revealed through single-cell phenotypic dynamics.
    Meng Jin, Yang Li, Richard O’Laughlin, Philip Bittihn, Lorraine Pillus, Lev S. Tsimring, Jeff Hasty, Nan Hao
    Cell Systems. 2019 Mar 27; 8(3):242-253.
  • Multigenerational silencing dynamics control cell aging.
    Yang Li, Meng Jin, Richard O’Laughlin, Philip Bittihn, Lev S. Tsimring, Lorraine Pillus, Jeff Hasty, Nan Hao
    Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2017 Oct 17;114 (42): 11253-11258.

Qualifications:

We welcome applications from highly motivated Ph.D. researchers, who have a solid background in biology, physics, or bioengineering, and a strong interest in developing their scientific careers in systems and synthetic biology. Our research projects span the spectrum of model organisms for studying the biology of aging. Researchers with experience in genetics or physiology of fruit flies or yeast are especially encouraged to apply.

How to Apply:

To apply, please email your cover letter and CV to: nhao@ucsd.edu

Postdoctoral Positions in the Oegema & Desai Labs

Description:

Postdoctoral research positions are available in the Oegema & Desai labs (ODLab) within the School of Biological Sciences at UC San Diego. Research in the ODlab is focused on addressing mechanisms of cell division, with projects on chromosome segregation/kinetochores, spindle assembly/centrosomes, and cytokinesis, as well as projects on control of mitotic entry, surveillance, and progression. The lab is also focused on relating fundamental understanding to the diversity of division mechanisms in different cell types/tissues and to pursue therapeutic targeting of cell division in cancer. Motivated candidates with prior research experience in mechanistic cell biology, microscopy (fixed and live imaging) and biochemistry/proteomics will be mentored to develop independent research projects. See oegemadesailab.org for more information.

Qualifications:

  • A Ph.D. in biology or related field; a Ph.D. in chemistry, physics or engineering will be considered with proper justification
  • No more than 2 years of previous postdoctoral research (i.e. within two years of doctoral degree conferment)
  • Experience with standard and emerging molecular biology approaches, microscopy, and biochemistry; experience with genome editing and cell engineering is desired but not required
  • Strong oral communication skills are required

Research Environment:

The ODlab is part of the large and highly collaborative School of Biological Sciences and the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at UC San Diego. Successful applicants will join a dynamic research environment to lead an independent project related to cell division and cancer. Postdocs in the ODlab lab are also encouraged to participate in collaborative projects to both enhance their knowledgebase and expand their scientific network.

How to Apply:

Please email odlabjobs@gmail.com to apply.

Email applications should include:

  • Cover letter summarizing previous research experience
  • Brief (<1 page) description of potential project interests and career goals
  • CV with complete publication list
  • Contact information for 3 referees

Postdoc in Neural Evolution and Development

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Division/Research Unit:

Cell & Developmental Biology

Description:

We seek an outstanding postdoctoral candidate to join the Perry lab at the University of California, San Diego. Our group uses genetic and genomic approaches to study the development and evolution of neural systems. We use the insect visual system as a model to understand how the genome encodes the complexity of the brain and nervous system. We are interested in the mechanisms that generate the exquisite diversity of ways in which animals perceive and interact with the world.

We are seeking independent, passionate, and highly motivated applicants for a postdoctoral position to study the  evolution and development of butterfly color vision . Butterflies have more complex retinal mosaics, allowing for an increased number of color comparisons (see Perry et al. Nature 2016). A successful applicant will use CRISPR to test candidate gene function directly in developing butterfly retinas. We are interested in understanding how the brain interprets additional input and the role of developmental plasticity. This approach will, in part, use genetic tools in  Drosophila to understand relevant circuits. The lab also uses single cell sequencing (10x Genomics) to uncover differences in neural systems across species followed tests of candidate gene function.

Applicant Requirements:

A Ph.D. in the biological sciences that includes at least three years of laboratory research experience in molecular or developmental biology is required. Experience with Drosophila or other genetic model systems is preferred but not required.

How to Apply:

This is a renewable two-year position with full benefits, which will be extended as needed upon performance of the candidate. Salary will be competitive and dependent on the level of experience. Applicants should email a CV and a description of research interests to Prof. Perry (mwperry@ucsd.edu), along with contact information for three references. Applications submitted by July 15th, 2021 will receive priority consideration, but the position will remain open until filled. Start date is flexible.

It is an incredibly exciting time to be a developmental biologist as new tools such as CRISPR and single cell sequencing allow us to move beyond model systems in order to ask targeted questions about the mechanisms that adapt animals to their unique environments. Apply and join the adventure!

Two fully-funded postdoctoral positions

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Molecular Biology

Description:

Two fully-funded postdoctoral positions are available in the laboratory of Dr. Maho Niwa in the Section of Molecular Biology at the University of California San Diego. The projects is interested in how eukaryotic cells handle non-genomic stress: (1) Specifically, how the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) responds to cellular stress such as increased demands for secretory protein or lipid production brought on by environmental challenge, injury or disease. This project focuses on the multi-dimensional Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling pathway in normal and disease states. (2) Separately, we discovered and are focused on understanding the first cell cycle checkpoint that monitors the ER, termed the ER Surveillance Checkpoint (ERSU). The ERSU checkpoint ensures that the size and functional capacities of the ER expand to meet the challenge of supplying two dividing cells during the cell cycle. We have shown, for example, that stress activation of this cell cycle checkpoint (which is independent of the UPR) causes a halt in cytokinesis by negatively regulating the septin complex needed to physically separate mother from daughter cells in S. cerevisiae mitosis. We are investigating how ER stress pauses this cell cycle progression machinery, using molecular and cellular approaches in both yeast and mammalian models. (3) We further study inter-organellar communication between the ER and the cell nucleus, in a new project funded by an Allen Distinguished Investigator Grant geared to understanding the architectural and functional coordination between these vital organelles and how they change under stress. This is critically important in mammalian cells as the ER and nuclear membranes are contiguous at multiple contact points and, at the onset of mitosis, the nuclear envelope (NE) breaks down and all the integral nuclear membrane proteins move into the ER. Later, as nuclear membranes reform at the end of mitosis, the integral nuclear membrane proteins must be preferentially retrieved from the ER. Overall, failure of the ER to meet one or more of the challenges detailed above is an underlying cause of many human diseases, including cancers and neurodegenerative disease. Therefore, we also use normal and disease models to dissect how the failure of the ER to make the needed changes in response to different stressors leads to human disease.

Applicants:

  • Applicants should have a Ph.D. degree in molecular biology or a related field.
  • Applicants should send the following information to mniwarosen@ucsd.edu
    • CV
    • Cover Letter summarizing how your expertise and interests fit with the lab projects
    • Contact information of 3 professional references

For additional information please visit the Niwa Lab Website

Proteostasis regulation in health and disease

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Cell & Development Biology

Description:

A postdoctoral research position is available in the Bennett lab within the School of Biological Sciences at UCSD. Research in the Bennett lab utilizes integrative molecular, cellular, and proteomic approaches to both identify new factors within stress response and protein quality control pathways, and to manipulate these pathways to alter stress response outcomes. Our goal is to leverage our molecular understanding of these pathways to beneficially impact aging-associated disorders. The Bennett lab is looking to recruit motivated postdoctoral researchers with strong previous research experience in biochemistry and/or cell biology. Initial research goals will focus on emerging projects centered on understanding the spatial organization of quality control pathways and investigating tissue-specific protein homeostasis networks. Postdocs are also encouraged to develop independent research projects. See ebennettlab.com for more information about the research environment.

Qualifications:

  • A Ph.D. in biology or related field.
  • No more than 2 years of previous postdoctoral research (i.e. within two years of doctoral degree conferment).
  • Experience with standard and emerging molecular biology approaches and cell engineering is desired but not required.
  • Existing knowledge of current proteomic technologies would be beneficial.
  • Strong oral communication skills are required.

Research Environment:

The Bennett lab is part of the large and highly collaborative School of Biological Sciences at UCSD. Successful applicants will join a highly dynamic research group to serve as a project leader for an independent research project in the protein homeostasis research space. Postdocs in the Bennett lab also participate in collaborative research projects to both enhance their research knowledgebase and expand their scientific network.

How to apply:

Please email Eric Bennett at e1bennett@ucsd.edu to apply.

Email applications should include:

  • Cover letter summarizing previous research experiences.
  • CV with complete publication list.
  • Upon request, 3 letters of reference.

Viral populations and their interactions with cell intrinsic innate immunity

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Molecular Biology

Description:

A post-doctoral position is available in the laboratory of Prof. Alistair Russell in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of California, San Diego. Our group seeks to understand how complex, genetically variable, viral populations interact with cell intrinsic innate immunity. We seek to understand the role of standing variation in viral populations with the elicitation of an immune response, as well as understand the tolerance of variation within viral populations with respect to the same phenomenon. Our group possess expertise in influenza A virus, but will be seeking to explore other viral pathogens of broad human interest. Studies in our group employ methodologies including deep mutational scanning, high-throughput sequencing, and single-cell transcriptomics coupled to single-cell viral genomics. Initial appointment for one year, renewable thereafter.

Description of environment:

Russell lab is within the dynamic Biological Sciences department at UCSD, and postdoctoral trainees will have opportunities to both present at and attend seminars with other groups working on viral biology, immunology, and RNA biology. Our group resides within the newly-constructed Tata Hall and shares space with several other laboratories with which we have shared meetings. Our department at UCSD is highly collegial, with many opportunities for collaborations, both formal and informal. This is a mentored position, and it is expected that applicants will be seeking training in the foundational expertise of our group, as well as training and mentorship specific to their goals in career development.

What we’re looking for

  • PhD in biology or a related field
  • Experience in at least one of
    • Virology
    • Immunology
    • Molecular Biology
    • Computational Biology
  • It is NOT expected applicants will have experience in all of the above, we are looking for a candidate who may be seeking training in at least one of the above fields, and would love to receive enthusiastic candidates looking to change fields
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills

Application Materials:

  • CV
  • Cover letter including a paragraph describing how your research interests fit with the job described
  • Contact information for 3 references
  • Email to: a5russell@ucsd.edu

Glial Development and Neurodegenerative Diseases

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Neurobiology

Description:

A post-doctoral position is available in the Division of Biological Science, Neurobiology section at UCSD in the laboratory of Stacey Glasgow. The primary goal of the research in the laboratory is to study how transcriptional and chromatin mechanisms regulate glial cell development and glioma tumor biology. We utilize biochemistry, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and chromatin conformation assays to address how developmental processes are reutilized during neurogenerative disease and malignancies.

Qualifications

Applicants must hold a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in biology, neuroscience or related fields. Candidates should have a strong background in molecular biology, animal models, and microscopy. Additional experience with developmental biology, cancer studies, and mouse surgery is desirable. The candidate will be expected to conduct an independent research project and work as part of a team.

How to Apply:

Please email Stacey Glasgow Ph.D. at sglasgow@ucsd.edu with any questions and to apply. Email applications should include:

  • A cover letter that summarizes past research and how your interests fit with the lab.
  • CV with complete publication list.
  • Contact information for 3 references

Mechanistic Dissection of Protein Disposal Machineries

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Cell and Developmental Biology

Description:

A post-doctoral position is available in the newly-established laboratory of Prof. Sonya Neal at the School of Biological Sciences of University of California San Diego (UCSD). We perform structural and biochemical analyses on cellular machineries involved in protein quality control through the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. ERAD is responsible for handling misfolded protein and protein assemblies to the cytosolic proteasome for degradation, a process that if impaired is strongly linked to neurodegenerative and protein misfolding diseases. We are using biochemistry, lipidomics, cell biology, and genetics to understand how rhomboid pseudoproteases remove multi-spanning membrane proteins from the ER lipid bilayer for targeted degradation by the cytosolic 26S proteasome. Studies will employ state-of-the-art tools for in vivo and in vitro manipulation of ERAD that has been developed by Dr. Neal (Molecular Cell, 2018).

What we offer:

  • A stimulating environment with freedom to develop new research directions
  • Regular opportunities to interact with our collaborators at UCSD Medical School, Salk, Scripps Research Institute, and the Sanford-Burnham Institute
  • Opportunity to participate in ER Stress Club held at the Sanford-Burnham Institute
  • Supportive mentorship for multi-faceted career development and opportunities tailored towards individual career goals
  • An NIH funded position at NRSA postdoctoral stipend levels+benefits
  • A department located in a metropolitan area of 1.3 million people with sunny weather, impressive beaches, variety of entertainment options and patchwork of diverse and vibrant neighborhoods

What we’re looking for:

  • Experience with structural biology and structural determination, as well as protein biochemistry, including protein production and purification is an asset
  • Collaborative, ambitious individuals with a strong interest in our research and environment
  • Ability to work independently to develop research projects and mentor others
  • Fearlessness in the design and implementation of new techniques and approaches for mechanistic analyses
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills

Application Materials:

  • CV
  • Cover letter including a paragraph describing how your research interests fit with the job described
  • Contact information for 3 references
  • Email to: seneal@ucsd.edu

Membrane Biology and Cellular Basis of Disease

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department/Research Unit:

Cell & Developmental Biology

Description:

Two NIH-funded postdoctoral positions are immediately available in the laboratory of Dr. Amy Kiger in the Section of Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of California San Diego. Projects will study cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle T-tubule membrane organization and remodeling. Emphasis is on the underlying membrane trafficking and its genetic regulation involved in maintaining muscle function and the cellular basis in fly models of human myopathy.

Research opportunities build on our published and unpublished studies, including novel genetic screen results, in Drosophila muscles that address factors involved in shaping and remodeling T-tubule membranes critical for muscle function (see Ribeiro et al. 2011 PLoS Genetics; and Fujita et al. 2017 eLife). Specific efforts explore specific endocytic and autophagic mechanisms involved in regulated disassembly and reassembly of T-tubule membranes during developmental and adult muscle remodeling programs.

Qualifications:

  • Ph.D. degree in cell or developmental biology or a related field.
  • Expertise in at least several of these areas: membrane biology/trafficking, muscle biology, microscopy imaging and image analysis, tissue dissections, Drosophila genetics, molecular biology and/or biochemistry.
  • Beneficial familiarity with or strong interest in animal studies that combine modern genetic modification methods with advanced live cell microscopy imaging techniques.
  • Primary publications in peer-reviewed journals demonstrating research excellence.
  • Highly motivated to learn, explore, engage and communicate in their scientific pursuits.

Research Environment

The muscle membrane projects parallel additional ongoing Kiger lab research on the regulation of phosphoinositide functions, endolysosomal trafficking and autophagy in other fly tissues and human cells. Postdoctoral candidates broadly interested in these other areas of membrane biology research are also encouraged to apply.

Successful candidates will join a dynamic research environment within the UCSD School of Biological Sciences, with access to many additional scientific and career/life opportunities in the broader San Diego research community.

How to apply:

Please email Amy Kiger Ph.D. at akiger@ucsd.edu with any questions and to apply. Email applications should include:

  • A cover letter that summarizes past research and how your interests fit with the lab projects.
  • CV with complete publication list.
  • Upon request, 3 letters of reference.

All positions are contingent on funding becoming available.

Applicants are welcome to include in their cover letters a personal statement summarizing leadership efforts and/or contributions to diversity. UC San Diego is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff.