Postdoctoral Openings

Neuropeptide Physiology

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Neurobiology

Description:

The Banghart Lab at UCSD has NIH-funded Postdoctoral Fellowship positions available to study neuropeptide signaling in the mammalian brain. Our physiological studies aim to understand the role of several neuropeptides in pain modulation, and molecular mechanisms that govern neuropeptide secretion in the brain. These efforts are facilitated by our development photoactivatable neuropeptides, precision pharmacological reagents, and neuropeptide sensors. This work is funded by the NIH Brain Initiative, NIDA and NIGMS.

Candidates with experience in molecular biology, cell culture and fluorescence microscopy are preferred. Additional experience with G-protein coupled receptors, intracellular signaling, electrophysiology, rodent behavior, and/or stereotactic surgery is highly desirable. Candidates must be willing to work as part of a team to contribute to collaborative tool-development projects while also pursuing an additional independent research project that exploits the resulting technologies. Applicants should hold a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in biology, pharmacology, neuroscience or related fields.

Research Environment

The Banghart Lab is located in the Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior (CNCB), which is the hub of UCSD Neuroscience community. We are proud to work in a highly interactive research environment that embraces diversity and work-life balance in addition to scientific excellence. Both positions will offer opportunities to write grants, train students and present findings at professional conferences. Salary will be a minimum of $50,760 according to UCSD guidelines.

How to Apply:

Candidates should send their CV and the names of 3 references to mbanghart@ucsd.edu.

For more information, please visit:

Mechanistic Dissection of Protein Disposal Machineries

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department:

Cell and Developmental Biology

Description:

A post-doctoral position is available in the newly-established laboratory of Prof. Sonya Neal at the Division of Biological Sciences of University of California San Diego (UCSD). We perform structural and biochemical analyses on cellular machineries involved in protein quality control through the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. ERAD is responsible for handling misfolded protein and protein assemblies to the cytosolic proteasome for degradation, a process that if impaired is strongly linked to neurodegenerative and protein misfolding diseases. We are using biochemistry, lipidomics, cell biology, and genetics to understand how rhomboid pseudoproteases remove multi-spanning membrane proteins from the ER lipid bilayer for targeted degradation by the cytosolic 26S proteasome. Studies will employ state-of-the-art tools for in vivo and in vitro manipulation of ERAD that has been developed by Dr. Neal (Molecular Cell, 2018).

What we offer:

  • A stimulating environment with freedom to develop new research directions
  • Regular opportunities to interact with our collaborators at UCSD Medical School, Salk, Scripps Research Institute, and the Sanford-Burnham Institute
  • Opportunity to participate in ER Stress Club held at the Sanford-Burnham Institute
  • Supportive mentorship for multi-faceted career development and opportunities tailored towards individual career goals
  • An NIH funded position at NRSA postdoctoral stipend levels+benefits
  • A department located in a metropolitan area of 1.3 million people with sunny weather, impressive beaches, variety of entertainment options and patchwork of diverse and vibrant neighborhoods

What we’re looking for:

  • Experience with structural biology and structural determination, as well as protein biochemistry, including protein production and purification is an asset
  • Collaborative, ambitious individuals with a strong interest in our research and environment
  • Ability to work independently to develop research projects and mentor others
  • Fearlessness in the design and implementation of new techniques and approaches for mechanistic analyses
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills

Application Materials:

  • CV
  • Cover letter including a paragraph describing how your research interests fit with the job described
  • Contact information for 3 references
  • Email to: seneal@ucsd.edu

Membrane Biology and Cellular Basis of Disease

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department/Research Unit:

Cell & Developmental Biology

Description:

Two NIH-funded postdoctoral positions are immediately available in the laboratory of Dr. Amy Kiger in the Section of Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of California San Diego. Projects will study cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle T-tubule membrane organization and remodeling. Emphasis is on the underlying membrane trafficking and its genetic regulation involved in maintaining muscle function and the cellular basis in fly models of human myopathy.

Research opportunities build on our published and unpublished studies, including novel genetic screen results, in Drosophila muscles that address factors involved in shaping and remodeling T-tubule membranes critical for muscle function (see Ribeiro et al. 2011 PLoS Genetics; and Fujita et al. 2017 eLife). Specific efforts explore specific endocytic and autophagic mechanisms involved in regulated disassembly and reassembly of T-tubule membranes during developmental and adult muscle remodeling programs.

Qualifications:

  • Ph.D. degree in cell or developmental biology or a related field.
  • Expertise in at least several of these areas: membrane biology/trafficking, muscle biology, microscopy imaging and image analysis, tissue dissections, Drosophila genetics, molecular biology and/or biochemistry.
  • Beneficial familiarity with or strong interest in animal studies that combine modern genetic modification methods with advanced live cell microscopy imaging techniques.
  • Primary publications in peer-reviewed journals demonstrating research excellence.
  • Highly motivated to learn, explore, engage and communicate in their scientific pursuits.

Research Environment

The muscle membrane projects parallel additional ongoing Kiger lab research on the regulation of phosphoinositide functions, endolysosomal trafficking and autophagy in other fly tissues and human cells. Postdoctoral candidates broadly interested in these other areas of membrane biology research are also encouraged to apply.

Successful candidates will join a dynamic research environment within the UCSD Division of Biological Sciences, with access to many additional scientific and career/life opportunities in the broader San Diego research community.

How to apply:

Please email Amy Kiger Ph.D. at akiger@ucsd.edu with any questions and to apply. Email applications should include:

  • A cover letter that summarizes past research and how your interests fit with the lab projects.
  • CV with complete publication list.
  • Upon request, 3 letters of reference.

Inflammatory Tumor Microenvironment and Its Impact on Cancer Development

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department/Research Unit:

Molecular Biology

Description:

The Lauberth laboratory in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of California San Diego welcomes applications for research positions at the postdoctoral level. The primary goal of the research in our laboratory is to study perturbations in gene regulation that lead to the development of human cancer. The open positions will focus on investigating the mechanisms that link the cancer-promoting effects of inflammation to genetic aberrations in the p53 gene, which are the most frequent alterations in human cancer. Using the stimulus-induced expression of inflammatory genes in human cancer cells as a model, the Lauberth lab has made important contributions in revealing mechanistic insights into how immune signaling drives alterations in the cancer cell transcriptome. Specifically, we have demonstrated a functional crosstalk between mutant p53 and the master proinflammatory regulator NFkB that shapes an active enhancer landscape to reprogram the cancer cell transcriptome in response to chronic TNFa signaling. These findings that have significant implications for understanding how p53 mutants impart transcriptional plasticity to a tumor in response to chronic immune signaling were published in Nature Communications 2017. To build upon these findings, the open positions will include leveraging mouse models and single-cell sequencing analyses to further explore the mechanisms underlying the roles of inflammatory cytokines in signaling between tumor and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment and to dissect the role of p53 mutants in modulating the composition and functions of the cell populations within a single tumor.

Applicant Requirements:

Candidates must have a strong background in biochemistry, molecular biology, and/or genomics and a first-author publication. The research will combine cell and molecular biology techniques, cell-free biochemical assays, and Next-Gen sequencing (ie. ChIP-seq, GRO-seq, ATAC-seq). We particularly value motivated, creative, and collaborative team members.

How to apply:

Interested applicants should send their cover letter containing a summary of their prior work and a short paragraph describing research interests and career plans, curriculum vitae, and the names of three references to Shannon Lauberth, PhD at slauberth@ucsd.edu.

For more information, please visit the Lauberth Lab website.

Noncoding RNAs in Human Cancer

Academic Division:

Biological Sciences

Academic Department/Research Unit:

Molecular Biology

Description:

The Lauberth laboratory in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of California San Diego welcomes applications for research positions at the postdoctoral level. The primary goal of the research in our laboratory is to study perturbations in gene regulation that lead to the development of human cancer. The open positions will focus on investigating the roles of noncoding enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) in human cancers that contain genetic alterations in p53, which are present in more than 50% of all human cancers. The recent and intriguing discovery that enhancers support transcription has raised a key question of whether eRNAs are functional molecules, or merely reflections of enhancer activation and thereby transcriptional noise. This question has gained considerable traction due to a number of recent studies that have started to unveil functions for at least a subset of eRNAs. We recently identified a class of enhancers that support eRNA production in a manner that is dependent on mutant p53 (Nature Communications 2017). The open positions will include research that is aimed to identify and characterize the functions of these eRNAs in gene regulation and cancer development. Also, the position will include exploring the feasibility of targeting this class of eRNAs as a means of silencing cancer-causing genes as a transformative approach in cancer treatment. These studies are of great significance, given the emerging field of functional eRNAs and the potential of using eRNAs as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for altering enhancer activities that are linked to human disease.

Applicant Requirements:

Candidates must have a strong background in biochemistry, molecular biology, and/or genomics and a first-author publication. The research will combine cell and molecular biology techniques, cell-free biochemical assays, and Next-Gen sequencing (ie. ChIP-seq, GRO-seq, ATAC-seq). We particularly value motivated, creative, and collaborative team members.

How to apply:

Interested applicants should send their cover letter containing a summary of their prior work and a short paragraph describing research interests and career plans, curriculum vitae, and the names of three references to Shannon Lauberth, PhD at slauberth@ucsd.edu.

For more information, please visit the Lauberth Lab website.

All positions are contingent on funding becoming available.

Applicants are welcome to include in their cover letters a personal statement summarizing leadership efforts and/or contributions to diversity. UC San Diego is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff.